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Salah

Hold on to your Salah, because if you loose that, you will loose everything else

Umar IBN Khattab (RA)

Ṣalāt (“prayer”, Arabic: صلاة‎ ṣalāh or gen: ṣalāt; pl. صلوات ṣalawāt) is the practice of ritualistic prayer in Islam as opposed to dua, which is the Arabic word for supplication. Its importance for Muslims is indicated by its status as one of the Five Pillars of Islam.

Salat is preceded by ritual ablution and usually performed five times a day. It consists of the repetition of a unit called a rakʿah (pl. rakaʿāt) consisting of prescribed actions and words. The number of obligatory (fard) rakaʿāt varies from two to four according to the time of day or other circumstances (such as Friday congregational worship, which has two rakats). Prayer is obligatory for all Muslims except those who are prepubescent, menstruating, or are experiencing bleeding in the 40 days after childbirth.[1] According the Pew Research Center, “two-thirds [of Muslims] pray every day (including 48% who pray all five salah daily).” [2]